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and welcome. five months after the uprising after colonel gaddafi's roll, britain has recognized the rebel council as the new government of libya. the u.s., france, and more than 30 other countries have recognized the council. our world affairs editor has this assessment. >> the libyan embassy in central london. a hugely valuable piece of real estate. the siege as usual by a small, ever present group of demonstrators. they were overjoyed by britain's decision to recognize them. this is tripoli where the heart of the city was the green square is decorated with a gigantic portrait of colonel gaddafi himself. he has never been a man to shrink from self publicity. britain, which was keenest about bombing libya has decided to cut the last remaining diplomatic links. >> we no longer recognize them as the representatives of the libyan government and we are inviting the national transitional council to appoint a new diplomat to take over the embassy in london. >> britain has joined 29 other countries in recognizing the national transitional council. france did so at the start. germany, turkey, and
for this to end. >> this is newsday on the bbc. i am in singapore. >> i am in london libya has condemned britain's decision to expel all of colonel khadafy's lipitor -- diplomats after recognizing the transitional council as the libyan government. >> norway has launched an independent inquiry into friday said the attacks. >> let's get more on that story now. thomas edgar was one of the first journalist on the scene after last friday's mass killing on the island. he says police reacted relatively quickly, despite criticism of their response time. >> there seems to be a lot of tension, especially among the journalists. in my opinion, they had two options. one was to wait for the helicopters being scrambled from one of the army bases, which was outside of oslo, then to get a pickup point, load their gear, flight to the island, etc. or they could go directly to the island, which is approximately 35 kilometers outside oslo. what police have been repeatedly saying house -- the last couple of days is that they made the right decision. they just jump in the car and made their way to the island and were
." >> this is bbc world news america. i m.j. and o'brien. britain recognizes the main opposition group as the governing authority, but will it break the stalemate? still on alert in norway, the suffering from last week's attacks continue to grip the country as the government promises an investigation. and counting down to the olympics, with just one year to go. london is busy getting ready. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. after months of nato bombing and continuing combat on the ground, the international effort to remove moammar gaddafi from power got another boost today. britain declared but another governing authority and expel the remaining diplomats from london. this follows the move by the u.s. and paves the way to unfreezing millions in dollars. but will it make a difference on the ground? john simpson reports. >> 6:00 in the morning in the mountains. spies have warned of a buildup of pro gaddafi forces nearby, but these are not trained soldiers. they are just a bunch of volunteers. hours pass, and the gaddafi troops do not attack. the rebels w
on the ground? we have this report. >> the government now is a significant boost for them. britain is following the u.s. and france in intensify the pressure on the libyan regime. >> we no longer recognize them as the representatives of the libyan government, and we are inviting the transitional council to appoint a new diplomatic convoy to take over the embassy in london. >> the libyan embassy in london is in nights bridge. the ambassador here was expelled in may. now, they have three days to leave. the other diplomats must go, as well. and they must deal with the frozen assets, now controlled by opponents of the regime. this is an important symbolic moment, especially for the small group of rebel supporters, who come here but to replace the flag of the gaddafi regime with their alone. the question is, what difference will it make on the ground? joining the demonstrators today, a former financial adviser at the embassy. >> this is very positive. it is a psychological boost, and the council will be able to use those funds to help the libyan people, and hopefully, this is just the beginning. >>
authorities. britain announces its next epps to push the gaddafi regime out. >> we are inviting the national transitional council to appoint a new libyan envoy in london. >> welcome to gmt. i am naga munchetty. intelligence chief says the man behind friday's attacks acted completely on his own. >> one year until the opening ceremony of the london 2012 olympic games, i am live at the aquatic center. speaking to athletes about their expectations ahead of the tournament. >> hello. it is midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, and the foreign office has just unveiled the latest deaths in the campaign to push the libyan leader, -- the latest steps in the campaign to push the libyan leader, muammar gaddafi, out of power. we'll get reaction from tripoli in a moment. first, here is the announcement made by the british foreign secretary. >> we informed him that he and other regime diplomats from the gaddafi regime must now leave the united kingdom. we no longer recognize them as the representatives of the libyan government and we are inviting the national transitional council to appoint a new envo
not have any words. she is sad. >> what they want is for colonel gaddafi to stand trial. this week, britain shifted its position. they said that colonel gaddafi must leave power, he could stay on in the country if that is what the people want. look at what happened here. look at the scale of destruction. hundreds of people died in the battle for misrata and they cannot forget or forgive. what they want is justice. however much britain frowns on america on a quick settlement, it is difficult to imagine a solution that is acceptable for the government in tripoli and the people of misrata. the city is still under attack. a petrol depot struck by rockets this week, this is hardly conducive for peace talks. the truth is that misrata remains on a war footing, hundreds of its men are dug-in, stretching for miles along the latest from lines. they are a little bit more organized, better equipped, even if they cannot always see who they are firing at. they plan to go all the way to tripoli. progress has been slower than britain and the west hoped-for. the fighting, not talking, that is the concentrat
that. >> we have no evidence of that in norway or in britain. >> but for now, the focus in norway is on the dead and those missing. the police will release more names as the terrible process of identifying all have been lost goes on. james robbins, bbc news, oslo. >> and as norway continues to mourn, the country's justice minister has praised the security services for their response to friday's attack, but four days on, there are questions about whether the police were quick enough to get to the rampage. local residents were the first to organize the rescue. gavin hewitt has been talking to some of those involved. >> across from the island, where so many died, there are still people waiting, with young people still missing. what is emerging here is the story of those rescued and questions about the police response. the heart of this rescue is a camp site. the two launched their boat to help people swimming from the island, where a man dressed as a policeman was hunting their friends down. >> the first thing was, they do not trust us. "i cannot trust you." we have to make some comf
about that. >> any other information on what his relationship with britain is? >> i do not know. it is too early in the case. i do not alloknow. >> is it true he went to liberia? can you confirm that? >> i do not know. >> how about the ways he communicated with the cells. >> i cannot comment because i don't know. it is difficult for me to answer. >> there was a fear he might send signals to those cells. that was a fear. >> did he want to read the manifesto at the initial hearing? >> yes, he wanted to read it and he read some of it for the judge. >> how much? >> maybe five minutes or something like that. >> [inaudible] at what point exactly? >> after the bombing, after the action in the island, and he also thought he would be killed at the trial. he believes someone would kill him. >> the other cells [inaudible] >> that is correct. >> [inaudible] has he said anything about that? >> he knows he is not permitted to say anything. >> [inaudible] >> it is complicated for me to answer. >> he actually surrendered to police -- can you explain why he did that? >> he was surrounded by the
, there are questions about the cozy relationship between the police come and media, and politicians in britain. >> i am the first prime minister publish meetings between senior executives, private tears -- proprietors. this stretches right back to the general election. >> it was his decision to fire the former "news of the world," editor andy coulson that is drawing the most criticism. there are questions about whether andy coulson knew about the illegal activity on his watch. >> he was caught in a tragic conflict of loyalty between the standards and integrity that people should expect of him and his staff and his personal allegiance to andy coulson. he made the wrong choice. >> you don't make decisions in hindsight, you make them in the present. you live and you learn and to believe you me, i have learned. >> the labor leader pointed out that downing street had been warned over andy coulson's past. the opposition also alleges that cameron has met 26 times with representatives from murdoch's companies since taking office. >> let's get the continuing impact of this whole scandal on rupert murdoch's empi
economy is stable at this time because the government has taken difficult decisions to get to britain's defeat. to -- to britain's debt. and they announced they have no plans to abandoned that plan. >> to norway, and the justice minister praising the fantastic work done by police after the bombing and shooting on utoeya island. but there has been criticism to have time it took police to get to the island. it's emerged that police also overestimated the number of people who died on the island and revised the death toll from 86 to 68. eight people were also killed in the bomb attack and a number of people are still missing from the island. >> the most important thing is we are completely focused on supporting the families of those and all those affected. we have things in mace all over the country and have people in our government affected. we have missing people at utoeya. and we have many people deeply affected. we have to look after them. i'm completely open to discuss how the response to these attacks have been handled. but i would like to emphasize that the police have done a magni
of them including france and britain, do have sympathy for the palestinian position. however, they do not want an american veto. they are afraid it could become violent in the occupied territories and that could, perhaps, get entangled in the protest of the wider arab world. that has not happened yet. so far, the air of spring has been very focused on internal issues. -- the era of the spring has been very focused on internal issues. america's standing in the region could take a hard hit, and the western states, too. the europeans are looking for a compromise, trying to convince the destiny is to drop their bid for membership, but to give them enough to get back to the peace process. whether or not they succeed, there is a sense that the arab- israeli conflict is becoming a major issue at the u.n. again and it will dominate in the coming months. >> britain has joined france in suggesting colonel gadhafi could remain in libya so long as he steps down from power. the british foreign secretary has been holding talks with his french counterpart. he said it was up to the libya -- libyan pe
of the probe of allegations of criminal misconduct by news corp., and a sign that britain's scandal is truly becoming an america reality. for the latest, i'm joined by martin fletcher in london. martin, david cameron says that the murdochs will have, and i'm quoting him, questions to answer. so that must mean that they may be dragged back to westminster. is that right? >> well, absolutely. you know, this is the accusations that are still rather published by the two former executives and by the way, they are not just former executi executives, but one was a executive of the firm and one was a top lawyer of the firm, and they say they had given james information when he was in charge of the committee, and so if it is proven that james murdoch was in possession of the information when he told the parliament committee that he had not been in possession of the information, that is serious indeed. much bigger problems to comen than what we have seen already. >> indeed. rupert has returned home to america. >> potentially. >> and it seems that the scandal has followed him because the justice departm
at home. ray suarez has our report. >> suarez: britain today added itself to a list of more than 30 countries, including the united states, now giving diplomatic recognition to the rebels' national transitional council. british foreign secretary william hague: >> the national transitional council has shown its commitment to a more open and democratic libya, something that it is working to achieve through an inclusive political process. this is in stark contrast to qaddafi whose brutality against the libyan people has stripped him of all legitimacy. >> suarez: hague also said the move paves the way for the rebels to get access to $150 million of libyan oil money held in britain. and he announced the expulsion of the few remaining envoys from colonel qaddafi's regime within three days, but they could reportedly be given more time if they choose to defect. qaddafi, meanwhile, continues to reject calls to step down and in a further act of defiance, libyan state television yesterday showed the lockerbie bomber abdelbaset al megrahi at a pro-government rally. his appearance comes nearly t
gets under way, britain has promised to intelligence cooperation. eyewitness accounts and analysis will all be fed in. the questions are, who was behind this and why. >> richard is on his way to the island. he has the latest details on the situation there. >> have actually got boats around the island now where the shooting took place. they are searching because they fear that there may be more bodies in the water. when the gunman opened fire, a very small island. there was huge panic. it is thought to be 600 or 700 people that were on the island at the time. some of them took the water, desperate to escape. some people tried to swim away. there is a fear that more bodies will be found in the water. there may also be more victims inside of the building where the bomb explosion took place in the mid afternoon. it is difficult for the emergency services to get inside the building. there is still a concern that there might be more bombs in the area, and there has been very significant damage to the building. it is dangerous for the emergency services again. >> the suspect who is in cus
that links the man accused of last friday's atrocity too right wing extremists in britain. the suspect was accused of holding meetings with such groups nine years ago, but the intelligence chief says that although investigations were continuing, she believed that he acted on his own in the planning of the bombing killed at least 76 people. of course, you can get much more on that story and the rest of the news we have been talking about on our website. for now, thank you very much for watching. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its global financial strength to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet los angeles. 
tonight. the hacking scandal in britain, the latest, a member of parliament is suggesting that one of the murdochs flat out lied when he spoke to the government leaders earlier this week, and he joins us from london when we come back. >>> new developments in britain's phone hacking scandal in depth tonight as the son of rupert murdoch comes under scrutiny. scotland yard was urged to open a criminal investigation into claims that the news corp. lied to parliament. this after a day of two former employees accused murdoch of giving mistaken evidence. he was the one hammering away at both murdochs about what they knew and when they knew it, and tom watson joins us from london. thank you so much for being here. you say this is the most significant moment in two years of phone hacking investigations, and it all centers on an e-mail involving an ex-news of the world reporter. explain. >> yes, the significance of this is the top team of news of the world are fragmenting. for the former lawyer to accuse murdoch of misleading parliament is serious in itself, and if he is accurate, and james
as early as 2009. britain has joined france in suggesting that colonel qaddafi should remain in libya so long as he steps down from power. william hague said that although britain's preference was for colonel qaddafi to go into exile, it was up to the libyan people to decide. now, to the u.s. debt talks which are locked in a bitter standoff. with just a little more than a week to go until the august 2 deadline when the u.s. must lift the debt ceiling or risk default, both sides are digging in for a fight. today, rival proposals were rolled out and tonight, the president will address the nation in a televised address. but among those who think the tea party republicans should hold their ground is freshman representative joe walsh and he joins me now from capitol hill. thank you very much for joining us. are you really prepared to risk the country going into default over this? >> no. no one wants to risk default. nobody up here in this town wants to do that, jane. we just want to make sure we get this right, that we get the solution right. we met with a couple of the credit agencies last w
the right thing. great britain were in the same place about a year ago. their debt was downgraded, this he had aaa, they lost it. they did the right thing, made some really hard, tough choices and they got the aaa back so you know, this isn't written in stone. we can -- our future is in our own making. we just have to do it. >> mark zandi thank you for making the time. good talking with you. >> thank you. >>> here's erica. >> thanks, as if congress needed any more problems, one of its members is quitting due to a sex scandal. bill whitaker has that story. >> reporter: congress may have trouble agreeing on almost anything but when it comes to one of their own and the subject is sex, they can act with blazing speed. oregon democrat david wu, who has served 13 years in the house, abruptly resigned on tuesday under heavy pressure from fellow democrats. this after allegations from the teenage daughter of a campaign donor allegedly accusing wu of an unwanted sexual encounter. >> the leadership probably figured that there wasn't much downside to getting him to resign. >> reporter: it was not the
lady in 1998, one year after china took control of the city from great britain. >>> there is much more ahead at 5:00. when we come back, summer camp with a twist. why a well-known surf spot is doing something that's never been done before. >>> tributes from around the world are pouring in tonight for the late amy winehouse. what fans are doing to remember the singer's sudden death stunned much the music world. >>> by land and sea, see how 400 people managed to escape from alcatraz today. >>> the skies did eventually clear over alcatraz. 63 degrees in san francisco. the low clouds backed off for the afternoon. and for the week ahead, we'll see some warmer temperatures but we're also watching moisture in southern california that could get closer to the bay area. we'll talk about chance of perhaps some thunder later this week in the forecast when we b it's really delicious, mom. it's not too well done? nope. but it is a job well done. what are you reading, sweetie? her diary. when you're done, i'd love some feedback. sure. your mom and i read that thing cover-to-cover. loved it. thanks.
dress and the princess who wore it. great britain's new crown jewel. >>> if you were left off the guest list of the royal wedding earlier this year, this could be the next best thing, a chance to check out the dress worn by kate middleton, the royal family's newest, brightest star. >> reporter: her moment of royal glory, kate's official arrival on the global stage. her dress was the other star of the show. today at buckingham palace, crowds waited for hours for a closeup look at a new display opening today. last week the queen and the new duchess got a sneak preview but didn't quite have the planned reaction. >> horrible isn't it? >> reporter: without kate in it, the dress appears ghost-like. still half a million fans are expected. >> she seems very sweet and she's very pretty, and she seems very nice. >> kate's memorabilia will raise millions for the monarchy, turning her into a valuable asset. the royals can't help but be impressed, less than three months after the wedding she is officially the hottest ticket in town. the wedding drew more than 1 million people to buckingham palace an
in britton this october -- britain this october. it will feature artists that will be announced next week. >>> gay marriage advocates are -- protesters are protesting two days after it's passed. protesters fared -- gathered at niagara falls. the niagara falls mayor was among those celebrating. >> this ceremony, a symbol of the ability to every couple of to legally wed here in the great state of new york could not have been held in a better place. >> opponents who timed the lawsuit say the bill was approved -- who filed the lawsuit say the bill was approved without going through the appropriate committees and lawmakers who approved the bill were not allowed to speak before the vote. >>> good afternoon to you. we are looking at a cooler day for your monday. take a look at what's going on here. finally breaking away from the clouds. you can see blue sky overhead mixed with the cloud cover that's been slower to burn often than what we saw sunday. take a look at what's going on. the peninsula, still socked in pretty good in parts of the east bay, looking at partly cloudy, mostly sunny skies in
it worthless. just a day or two ago, britain's top diplomat said that it would be possible to work out some kind of a deal with libya in which gadhafi could be allowed to stay in libya if he agreed to step down from power. that seemed to be a step backwards from britain, which was repeated by france. today britain's top diplomat came out more forcefully announcing he would hand over the libyan regimes embassy in london to the rebel counsel in the east in the city of bengazie. announced more than $100 million worth of frozen libyan government assets would be given over to the rebels. we have seen a growing number of western governments including the u.s. government announce similar plans to recognize the rebel council as the only legitimate authority here and announcing plans to hand over hundreds of millions of dollars to the rebels, and that of course is a proposal that the embattled government here in tripoli rejects. >> we appreciate your reporting. >>> it's about 15 minutes before the top of the hour. here is a look at some of the top stories we're following. a federal judge threw out a
abuse. meanwhile, winehouse's best known album has shot to the top of the charts in great britain. >>> when we come back here tonight, after days of brutal heat, could the weather finally be taking a turn? >>> it was a little cooler today, a little, along the east coast, but what a week it has been. the heat dome that enveloped much of the country grew out of the midwest and slowly moved east, breaking more than 800 temperature records along the way. we're joined now by the weather channel's stephanie moore. what's it look like in the days ahead, stephanie? >> looks like we're going to see that heat start to break a little bit, lester. in fact, we're already starting to see that happen across parts of the northeast. thank goodness, we'll take every break we can get. you know, in dallas-ft. worth, we have had some 23 straight days of 100 or better. since july 1st, we've been in the upper 90s. in raleigh durham five straight day of temperatures above 100 degrees. that's a new record for them. we're now down to 90 in raleigh/durham. due to thunderstorms in the area. dallas is still r
target. al qaeda is trying to hit softer, more powerful role targets other than america and britain. >> tonight, soldiers are on the streets of oslo and norway's government is holding crisis meetings. there is shock that the city's peace could be shattered like this. >> and just a brief time ago, president obama spoke about these attacks with the new zealand -- with new zealand's prime minister. >> i want to personally extend my condolences to the people of norway, and it is a reminder that the entire international community has a stake in preventing this kind of terror. we have to work cooperatively both on intelligence and in terms of prevention. >> joining me now to discuss the motivation of who might have been behind the attacks as the former u.s. deputy national security adviser who is currently at the center for strategic and international studies. thank you for joining us. >> my pleasure. >> why would note -- norway bbea target for attacks? >> it is a peaceful country, but it has become more and more a target for global jihadists. norway since the days of 2001, 2002 they have
defector. he says the general's death will make them more determined to push on to tripoli. britain gave its full backing to the rebel government, and the west hope they are right. >> tens of thousands of syrians have turned out again for protest across the country, demanding the president resigned. it has killed elise four people. the biggest rally appears to be in hamas. there was a report of of fighting in several other cities. here we have this report from damascus. >> people chant for the sake of god and we walk. people want the downfall of the regime. hear, the city that has witnessed the biggest conflict across the country, people have determined to they want the regime out. thousands of people took to the streets and decided that silence is killing us. -- here is a different scene. police used teargas to disperse protesters. this is it in a town that is a suburb of damascus. today, it blamed the past -- a blast for sabotage. using heavy helicopters where people were killed in the early hours of morning by security forces. they want to crack down on protests and it seems -- it doe
. >> as the investigation gets under way, britain has promised intelligence cooperation. forensic, eyewitness accounts and telephone analysis will all be fed in. the unanswered questions are, who was behind this and why? >> richard capt. is on his way to the island of -- richard galpin is on his way to the island of utoeya. he filed this report. >> they fear there may be more bodies in the water. boats are searching. we know that when the gunmen opened fire on this island, there was huge panic. there's got to be something like 600-700 people who were on the island at the time. some of them took to the water and tried to swim away. there is a fear that more bodies will be found in the water. those in the red cross were saying to me that there may also be more victims inside the building where the bomb explosion took place in the mid afternoon here in central oslo because it is difficult for the emergency services to get inside the building. there is a concern that there might be more bombs in the area. there has been very significant damage to the building, so it is dangerous from that point of view fo
to commemorate the 9/11 attack. >>> what britain's prime minister wants done to all media. ,,,,,,,, >>> it is 6:30. mostly sunny. and 87 degrees. good evening, everyone. thanks for staying with wjz. here are some of the stories people are talking about tonight. a judge in london will dig further into the phone hacking scandal that has rocked lond an's moodia empire -- london's media empire. >> reporter: the british judge leading the first public hearings into the phone hacking scandal says he will be demanding evidence from witnesses. >> it may be tempting for a number of people to close ranks and suggest the problem is or was local towards a small group of journalists, then operating "news of the world." >> reporter: brian levinson says they will look into the media's relationship with the public, police and politicians. >> very, very serious. >> reporter: parliament grilled newscorps boss, rupert murdoch last week. >> reporter: the government backed investigation will look into allegations eavesdropping was happening at other media outlets, too. several journalists are on the panel, along wi
's what people are talking about. britain's simmering phone hacking scandal erupts today. a judge is digging deeper into the case to see if the country needs tougher media regulation. tina kraus reports from london. >> reporter: the british judge, leading the first public hearings into the fine hacking scandal, says he will be demanding evidence from witnesses. >> it may be tempting for a number of people to close ranks and suggest the problem is or was local to a small group of journalists then operating "news of the world." >> the investigation will look into the media's relationship with the public, police and politicians. >> very, very serious. >> parliament-grilled rupert murdoch and his son james last week. journalists said they are accused of hacking the voice mails of murder and terror victims. the government-backed investigations will look into allegations of eavesdropping at other media outlets, too. several journalists are on the panel to help police chiefs, to help expose corrupt practices. >> reporter: police investigations are also under way to hacking and bribery wi
hacking scandal that has shaken britain's media empire. tina kraus reports for wjz from london. >> reporter: the british judge, leading the first public hearings into the phone hacking scandal says he will be depanding evidence from witnesses. >> it may be tempting for a number of people to close ranks. and suggest the problem is or was local to a small group of journalists, then operating the news of the world. >> reporter: brian lev levinson said they will look into the relationship with the public, police and politicians. parlparliament grilled -- parliament grilled hupert murdoch. they are accused of hacking the voice mails of murder and will terror victims. the government-backed v investigations will look into allegations that eavesdropping was in others too. several journalists were on the panel. helping to expose corrupt practices. >> reporter: police investigations are also under way into hacking and bribery within the force. scotland yard is defending its officers. >> reporter: let me reassure you. corruption is in no way endemic, within the police service, or within t
. it is the gown that katherine wore when she married britain's prince william. the ivory and white is a in the dress is the centerpiece at buckingham palaces annual summer opening. the gone stands on a special platform topped off with a tiara the queen loaned katherine for that wedding. >>> wolf blitzer joins us in such a few minutes. first breaking news. we want to get you caught up right now. >>> survivor describing how he avoided the gunman that shot up a youth camp in norway. 85 people died following a bombing in the capital of oslo which claimed seven lives. police have suspect in custody. michael, what's happening now? >> reporter: yeah. i can tell you, we've just heard on local media here that the lawyer for the suspect in this case, his name is anders behring breivik, the lawyer is telling the local television here that the shooting suspect believed that his actions were atrocious, but necessary. that's within the last few minutes. his lawyer saying that he believed his actions were atrocious but necessary. and how atrocious were there? 85 people, most of them kids killed o
on the dotted line? >>> plus another twist in britain's phone hacking scandal, find out which high level news corp. exec could soon be under investigation. that's coming up .  >>> getting back to the debate over the debt ceiling now, talks breaking down today and major garrett joins us. thank you for being with us tonight. >> my pleasure. >> i assume you're not surprised from what you were saying here last night. >> not really. the prospect of a big grand bargain always seemed very difficult to achieve and clearly you saw tonight the country saw two very frustrated political leaders, one president obama and one speaker boehner. they thought they were at least within range, but in the end disagreements over tax increases and the magnitude and spes 50 of entitlement cuts meaning -- specificity of entitlement cuts meaning med care, medicaid and social security prove -- medicare, medicaid and social security proved too much for the house leaders to agree on. now over the weekend they have to come up with a debt ceiling increase plan that meets the president's and speaker boehner's co
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 154 (some duplicates have been removed)

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